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The daily summaries are written by Wayne D. Turner, Pastor of Fayette Bible Church in Fayetteville, Georgia

This is the August 24 reading. Select here for a new reading date:


BibleTrack Summary: August 24
<< 1 King 15
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For New King James text and comment, click here.

 

Kings & Prophets
 

I Kings 15:25-16:34; II Chronicles 17   Listen Podcast

Meanwhile...back in evil Israel - a big king change (I Kings 15:25-34)

25 And Nadab the son of Jeroboam began to reign over Israel in the second year of Asa king of Judah, and reigned over Israel two years.
26 And he did evil in the sight of the LORD, and walked in the way of his father, and in his sin wherewith he made Israel to sin.
27 And Baasha the son of Ahijah, of the house of Issachar, conspired against him; and Baasha smote him at Gibbethon, which belonged to the Philistines; for Nadab and all Israel laid siege to Gibbethon.
28 Even in the third year of Asa king of Judah did Baasha slay him, and reigned in his stead.
29 And it came to pass, when he reigned, that he smote all the house of Jeroboam; he left not to Jeroboam any that breathed, until he had destroyed him, according unto the saying of the LORD, which he spake by his servant Ahijah the Shilonite:
30 Because of the sins of Jeroboam which he sinned, and which he made Israel sin, by his provocation wherewith he provoked the LORD God of Israel to anger.
31 Now the rest of the acts of Nadab, and all that he did, are they not written in the book of the chronicles of the kings of Israel?
32 And there was war between Asa and Baasha king of Israel all their days.
33 In the third year of Asa king of Judah began Baasha the son of Ahijah to reign over all Israel in Tirzah, twenty and four years.
34 And he did evil in the sight of the LORD, and walked in the way of Jeroboam, and in his sin wherewith he made Israel to sin.

There still hasn't been a Godly king in Israel (Hint: and there won't be). Jeroboam's son, Nadab, becomes King of Israel (yeah, he's bad too). Then Baasha kills Nadab and subsequently turns loose on all of Jeroboam's descendants and kills them also - guess no more kings from Jeroboam, just as the prophet Ahijah had said (I Kings 14:14, see notes). Why? The answer is in I Kings 14:1-20 (see notes); Jeroboam was evil in the sight of God - stated again here in I Kings 15:30. Now it's King Baasha...and, of course, he's bad too - just couldn't bring himself to serve God. It just never became a tradition among the Kings of the Northern Kingdom to forsake idols and turn to God as the only one true God.

A Summary of King #2 from 910 to 909 B.C. over Israel (Northern Kingdom): Nadab
References The Good The Bad

I Kings 15:25-31

No good...just evil

I Kings 15:26 And he did evil in the sight of the LORD, and walked in the way of his father, and in his sin wherewith he made Israel to sin.

This marks the end of the first dynasty of the newly-formed Northern Kingdom of Israel.

A Summary of King #3 from 909 to 886 B.C. over Israel (Northern Kingdom): Baasha
References The Good The Bad

I Kings 15:32-16:7
II Chronicles 16:1-6

No good...just evil

I Kings 15:34 And he did evil in the sight of the LORD, and walked in the way of Jeroboam, and in his sin wherewith he made Israel to sin.

God's not happy with Baasha (I Kings 16:1-7)

1 Then the word of the LORD came to Jehu the son of Hanani against Baasha, saying,
2 Forasmuch as I exalted thee out of the dust, and made thee prince over my people Israel; and thou hast walked in the way of Jeroboam, and hast made my people Israel to sin, to provoke me to anger with their sins;
3 Behold, I will take away the posterity of Baasha, and the posterity of his house; and will make thy house like the house of Jeroboam the son of Nebat.
4 Him that dieth of Baasha in the city shall the dogs eat; and him that dieth of his in the fields shall the fowls of the air eat.
5 Now the rest of the acts of Baasha, and what he did, and his might, are they not written in the book of the chronicles of the kings of Israel?
6 So Baasha slept with his fathers, and was buried in Tirzah: and Elah his son reigned in his stead.

7 And also by the hand of the prophet Jehu the son of Hanani came the word of the LORD against Baasha, and against his house, even for all the evil that he did in the sight of the LORD, in provoking him to anger with the work of his hands, in being like the house of Jeroboam; and because he killed him.

Could the prophet, Jehu, have given a more negative prophecy concerning King Baasha of Israel? He declares that his lineage won't continue as kings over Israel. (Is it any wonder that the Israeli kings hated God's prophets?) His condemnation by the word of the prophet was because of Baasha's treachery and general state of evilness. He's followed by his son, Elah. We're now into the second dynasty of the newly-formed Northern Kingdom of Israel, and this dynasty will soon close out with the death of Baasha's son, Elah.

A short reign for Elah (I Kings 16:8-14)

8 In the twenty and sixth year of Asa king of Judah began Elah the son of Baasha to reign over Israel in Tirzah, two years.
9 And his servant Zimri, captain of half his chariots, conspired against him, as he was in Tirzah, drinking himself drunk in the house of Arza steward of his house in Tirzah.
10 And Zimri went in and smote him, and killed him, in the twenty and seventh year of Asa king of Judah, and reigned in his stead.
11 And it came to pass, when he began to reign, as soon as he sat on his throne, that he slew all the house of Baasha: he left him not one that pisseth against a wall, neither of his kinsfolks, nor of his friends.
12 Thus did Zimri destroy all the house of Baasha, according to the word of the LORD, which he spake against Baasha by Jehu the prophet,
13 For all the sins of Baasha, and the sins of Elah his son, by which they sinned, and by which they made Israel to sin, in provoking the LORD God of Israel to anger with their vanities.
14 Now the rest of the acts of Elah, and all that he did, are they not written in the book of the chronicles of the kings of Israel?

So, Baasha dies, and Elah, his boy, becomes King of Israel - but only for two years. Zimri, one of the Israeli army commanders, kills him and takes over as King of Israel. He also wipes out the entirety of Baasha/Elah's male descendants to put to rest once and for all the prophecy of Jehu against Baasha. This slaying of Baasha's male descendants is expressed in a very interesting way in the Hebrew text. Of modern translations, only the King James Version keeps the Hebrew phrase intact in I Kings 16:11; that's exactly how the Hebrew phrase identifies these male heirs. We are told in verse 12 that this treachery was in accordance with Jehu's prophecy declaring the end of Baasha's dynasty. In addition, we see that Zimri not only slays the male heirs, but also Elah's other male relatives and even his male friends.

A Summary of King #4 from 886 to 885 B.C. over Israel (Northern Kingdom): Elah
References The Good The Bad

I Kings 16:8-14

No good...just evil

I Kings 16:13 For all the sins of Baasha, and the sins of Elah his son, by which they sinned, and by which they made Israel to sin, in provoking the LORD God of Israel to anger with their vanities.

This marks the end of the second dynasty of Israel.

Zimri - a fantasy vacation or King of Israel (I Kings 16:15-20)

15 In the twenty and seventh year of Asa king of Judah did Zimri reign seven days in Tirzah. And the people were encamped against Gibbethon, which belonged to the Philistines.
16 And the people that were encamped heard say, Zimri hath conspired, and hath also slain the king: wherefore all Israel made Omri, the captain of the host, king over Israel that day in the camp.
17 And Omri went up from Gibbethon, and all Israel with him, and they besieged Tirzah.
18 And it came to pass, when Zimri saw that the city was taken, that he went into the palace of the king’s house, and burnt the king’s house over him with fire, and died,
19 For his sins which he sinned in doing evil in the sight of the LORD, in walking in the way of Jeroboam, and in his sin which he did, to make Israel to sin.
20 Now the rest of the acts of Zimri, and his treason that he wrought, are they not written in the book of the chronicles of the kings of Israel?

He became King of Israel, all right - but only after he killed Elah and took it. Ocean cruises last longer than his kingship over Israel. After just 7 days Omri takes over and Zimri commits suicide. He was evil for the whole 7 days. Whoa! Israel's Northern Kingdom is a tough place to serve as king; it seems the moment you get the crown, someone is after your head.

The dynasty math gets a little fuzzy here. Zimri was king (sorta) for only seven days after he killed Elah. Omri, who became the next king was not related to Zimri. Would you call Zimri's seven-day reign a dynasty? Since the definition of a dynasty is "the succession of rulers from the same family," I guess Zimri by himself, does not constitute a dynasty. For seven days we're between dynasties two and three.

A Summary of King #5 in 885 B.C. (for 7 days) over Israel (Northern Kingdom): Zimri
References The Good The Bad

I Kings 16:15-20

No good...just evil

I Kings 16:19 For his sins which he sinned in doing evil in the sight of the LORD, in walking in the way of Jeroboam, and in his sin which he did, to make Israel to sin.

Omri moves Israel's capital (I Kings 16:21-28)

21 Then were the people of Israel divided into two parts: half of the people followed Tibni the son of Ginath, to make him king; and half followed Omri.
22 But the people that followed Omri prevailed against the people that followed Tibni the son of Ginath: so Tibni died, and Omri reigned.
23 In the thirty and first year of Asa king of Judah began Omri to reign over Israel, twelve years: six years reigned he in Tirzah.
24 And he bought the hill Samaria of Shemer for two talents of silver, and built on the hill, and called the name of the city which he built, after the name of Shemer, owner of the hill, Samaria.
25 But Omri wrought evil in the eyes of the LORD, and did worse than all that were before him.
26 For he walked in all the way of Jeroboam the son of Nebat, and in his sin wherewith he made Israel to sin, to provoke the LORD God of Israel to anger with their vanities.
27 Now the rest of the acts of Omri which he did, and his might that he shewed, are they not written in the book of the chronicles of the kings of Israel?
28 So Omri slept with his fathers, and was buried in Samaria: and Ahab his son reigned in his stead.

The divided kingdom gets divided again, but not for long. After the death of Zimri, "half of the people" followed a king named Tibni. However, Omri's people overcame Tibni's people (in less than two verses), and Omri becomes the undisputed King of the Northern Kingdom. King Omri buys land and builds his new capital city, Samaria, named after the guy (Shemer) from whom he bought it. He reigns in Israel for 12 1/2 years. And...of course, he was evil also - just wouldn't serve God.

A Summary of King #6 from 885 to 874 B.C. over Israel (Northern Kingdom): Omri
References The Good The Bad

I Kings 16:23-28

No good...just evil

I Kings 16:25-26 But Omri wrought evil in the eyes of the LORD, and did worse than all that were before him. For he walked in all the way of Jeroboam the son of Nebat, and in his sin wherewith he made Israel to sin, to provoke the LORD God of Israel to anger with their vanities.

Now we are into the third dynasty of Israel which continues through II Kings 9 (see notes), ending with Omri's great grandson, Jehoram.

King Ahab sets a record (I Kings 16:29-34)

29 And in the thirty and eighth year of Asa king of Judah began Ahab the son of Omri to reign over Israel: and Ahab the son of Omri reigned over Israel in Samaria twenty and two years.
30 And Ahab the son of Omri did evil in the sight of the LORD above all that were before him.
31 And it came to pass, as if it had been a light thing for him to walk in the sins of Jeroboam the son of Nebat, that he took to wife Jezebel the daughter of Ethbaal king of the Zidonians, and went and served Baal, and worshipped him.
32 And he reared up an altar for Baal in the house of Baal, which he had built in Samaria.
33 And Ahab made a grove; and Ahab did more to provoke the LORD God of Israel to anger than all the kings of Israel that were before him.
34 In his days did Hiel the Bethelite build Jericho: he laid the foundation thereof in Abiram his firstborn, and set up the gates thereof in his youngest son Segub, according to the word of the LORD, which he spake by Joshua the son of Nun.

Omri's boy, Ahab, becomes King of Israel; his wife, Jezebel, helps make his reign a notable one. Jezebel's father was Ethbaal, king of the Zidonians. Sidon (home of the Zidonians) was a Philistine city north of Israel on the coast. Why don't parents name their daughters "Jezebel?" As we read, it may become apparent. He and Jezebel were way into Baal worship - built a worship center to Baal in Samaria. He also set up "a grove" (Hebrew: "asherah"), which was actually a wooden image, or a pillar representing Ashtoreth, a sensual Canaanitish goddess. In pagan societies, she often served as the female complement to Baal. In gleaning from the usage in the Old Testament, it is commonly believed that "Ashtoreth" was the proper name of the goddess, while "Asherah" was the name of her image or symbol, which was constructed of wood.

Ahab and Jezebel had no use for God or the things of God. Ahab commissions the rebuilding of Jericho despite the prophecy of Joshua against doing so in Joshua 6:26 (see notes) "And Joshua adjured them at that time, saying, Cursed be the man before the LORD, that riseth up and buildeth this city Jericho: he shall lay the foundation thereof in his firstborn, and in his youngest son shall he set up the gates of it." And...just as the prophecy had stated, Hiel, the man commissioned to the rebuilding project, loses his eldest and youngest sons, just as Joshua had said (verse 34).

Ahab and Jezebel are two very colorful and evil figures in Israel's history. Ahab is credited with a unique distinction in verse 33, "Ahab did more to provoke the LORD God of Israel to anger than all the kings of Israel that were before him." How's that for the record books!

A Summary of King #6 from 874 to 853 B.C. over Israel (Northern Kingdom): Ahab
References The Good The Bad

I Kings 16:28-34;
I Kings 20:1-22:40

No good...just evil

I Kings 16:30-33 And Ahab the son of Omri did evil in the sight of the LORD above all that were before him. And it came to pass, as if it had been a light thing for him to walk in the sins of Jeroboam the son of Nebat, that he took to wife Jezebel the daughter of Ethbaal king of the Zidonians, and went and served Baal, and worshipped him. And he reared up an altar for Baal in the house of Baal, which he had built in Samaria. And Ahab made a grove; and Ahab did more to provoke the LORD God of Israel to anger than all the kings of Israel that were before him.

Jehoshaphat - big name with a big army (II Chronicles 17)

1 And Jehoshaphat his son reigned in his stead, and strengthened himself against Israel.
2 And he placed forces in all the fenced cities of Judah, and set garrisons in the land of Judah, and in the cities of Ephraim, which Asa his father had taken.
3 And the LORD was with Jehoshaphat, because he walked in the first ways of his father David, and sought not unto Baalim;
4 But sought to the LORD God of his father, and walked in his commandments, and not after the doings of Israel.
5 Therefore the LORD stablished the kingdom in his hand; and all Judah brought to Jehoshaphat presents; and he had riches and honour in abundance.
6 And his heart was lifted up in the ways of the LORD: moreover he took away the high places and groves out of Judah.
7 Also in the third year of his reign he sent to his princes, even to Benhail, and to Obadiah, and to Zechariah, and to Nethaneel, and to Michaiah, to teach in the cities of Judah.
8 And with them he sent Levites, even Shemaiah, and Nethaniah, and Zebadiah, and Asahel, and Shemiramoth, and Jehonathan, and Adonijah, and Tobijah, and Tobadonijah, Levites; and with them Elishama and Jehoram, priests.
9 And they taught in Judah, and had the book of the law of the LORD with them, and went about throughout all the cities of Judah, and taught the people.
10 And the fear of the LORD fell upon all the kingdoms of the lands that were round about Judah, so that they made no war against Jehoshaphat.
11 Also some of the Philistines brought Jehoshaphat presents, and tribute silver; and the Arabians brought him flocks, seven thousand and seven hundred rams, and seven thousand and seven hundred he goats.
12 And Jehoshaphat waxed great exceedingly; and he built in Judah castles, and cities of store.
13 And he had much business in the cities of Judah: and the men of war, mighty men of valour, were in Jerusalem.
14 And these are the numbers of them according to the house of their fathers: Of Judah, the captains of thousands; Adnah the chief, and with him mighty men of valour three hundred thousand.
15 And next to him was Jehohanan the captain, and with him two hundred and fourscore thousand.
16 And next him was Amasiah the son of Zichri, who willingly offered himself unto the LORD; and with him two hundred thousand mighty men of valour.
17 And of Benjamin; Eliada a mighty man of valour, and with him armed men with bow and shield two hundred thousand.
18 And next him was Jehozabad, and with him an hundred and fourscore thousand ready prepared for the war.
19 These waited on the king, beside those whom the king put in the fenced cities throughout all Judah.

While the Northern Kingdom was screaming through a line of kings, the Southern Kingdom gets Jehoshaphat as their king, mentioned first in I Kings 15:24 (see notes) as the successor to his father, Asa. Jehoshaphat was a good king, as his Dad (Asa) was early in his reign. Like his Dad, he got rid of the "high places" at the beginning of his reign, but we see by II Chronicles 20:33 (see notes) that they later reappeared, and he let it go. Fighting idol worship was a constant uphill battle among the Jews. But look at Jehoshaphat's army. I count it to be altogether well over 1 million strong! No wonder all the kings around him were sending gifts. He was zealous in the ways of the Lord - even sending priests and teachers out to the people of Israel to teach them the ways of the One True God. Jehoshaphat stays around through chapter 20. And he gets a lot of coverage in I and II Kings as well, from I Kings 15 all the way to II Kings 8 when his son, Jehoram, begins to reign.

A Summary of King #4 from 873 to 848 B.C. over Judah: Jehoshaphat
References The Good The Bad

I Kings 22
II Chronicles 17-20

II Chronicles 17:3-4 And the LORD was with Jehoshaphat, because he walked in the first ways of his father David, and sought not unto Baalim; But sought to the LORD God of his father, and walked in his commandments, and not after the doings of Israel.

II Chronicles 20:32 And he walked in the way of Asa his father, and departed not from it, doing that which was right in the sight of the LORD.

I Kings 22:43 And he walked in all the ways of Asa his father; he turned not aside from it, doing that which was right in the eyes of the LORD: nevertheless the high places were not taken away; for the people offered and burnt incense yet in the high places.

I Kings 22:46 And the remnant of the sodomites, which remained in the days of his father Asa, he took out of the land.

I Kings 22:43b ...nevertheless the high places were not taken away; for the people offered and burnt incense yet in the high places.

II Chronicles 20:33 Howbeit the high places were not taken away: for as yet the people had not prepared their hearts unto the God of their fathers.

Jehoshaphat spent a lot of quality time around the notoriously evil King of Israel, Ahab.

 


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Copyright 2003-2011 by Wayne D. Turner