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This is a chronologically-ordered Bible site with commentary on each passage.
The daily summaries are written by Wayne D. Turner, Pastor of Fayette Bible Church in Fayetteville, Georgia

This is the May 25 reading. Select here for a new reading date:


BibleTrack Summary: May 25
<< Matt 25
<< Mark 13
<< Luke 21
<< John 12

For New King James text and comment, click here.

Matthew 26:1-30; Mark 14:1-26        Listen Podcast
Luke 21:37-22:30; John 12:44-13:35

 

In this passage, we see the following in Jesus' ministry:

 

 

Jesus is preaching in the temple (Luke 21:37-38; John 12:44-50)

Luke 21
John 12
37 And in the day time he was teaching in the temple; and at night he went out, and abode in the mount that is called the mount of Olives.
38 And all the people came early in the morning to him in the temple, for to hear him.
44 Jesus cried and said, He that believeth on me, believeth not on me, but on him that sent me.
45 And he that seeth me seeth him that sent me.
46 I am come a light into the world, that whosoever believeth on me should not abide in darkness.
47 And if any man hear my words, and believe not, I judge him not: for I came not to judge the world, but to save the world.
48 He that rejecteth me, and receiveth not my words, hath one that judgeth him: the word that I have spoken, the same shall judge him in the last day.
49 For I have not spoken of myself; but the Father which sent me, he gave me a commandment, what I should say, and what I should speak.
50 And I know that his commandment is life everlasting: whatsoever I speak therefore, even as the Father said unto me, so I speak.

Luke just records that Jesus preached in the temple each day during the gathering in Jerusalem for the passover. John specifies that Jesus preached the prerequisite to eternal life - believing on Jesus, trusting Jesus as Savior. He makes the contrast between abiding in light and darkness and then issues a stern warning regarding judgment on those who reject Jesus as Savior. There's a solemn warning applicable to all in John 12:48, "He that rejecteth me, and receiveth not my words, hath one that judgeth him: the word that I have spoken, the same shall judge him in the last day." We will all be judged by the message of Jesus. Just a few hours later, Jesus would make this statement in John 14:6, "I am the way, the truth, and the life: no man cometh unto the Father, but by me." These two verses stand on their own without commentary: The only way to God is through Jesus Christ. God has not provided an alternate means of salvation - just Jesus as Savior.

The Sanhedrin conspires against Jesus (Matthew 26:1-5; Mark 14:1-2; Luke 22:1-2)

Matthew 26
Mark 14
Luke 22
1 And it came to pass, when Jesus had finished all these sayings, he said unto his disciples,
2 Ye know that after two days is the feast of the passover, and the Son of man is betrayed to be crucified.
3 Then assembled together the chief priests, and the scribes, and the elders of the people, unto the palace of the high priest, who was called Caiaphas,
4 And consulted that they might take Jesus by subtilty, and kill him.
5 But they said, Not on the feast day, lest there be an uproar among the people.
1 After two days was the feast of the passover, and of unleavened bread: and the chief priests and the scribes sought how they might take him by craft, and put him to death.
2 But they said, Not on the feast day, lest there be an uproar of the people.
1 Now the feast of unleavened bread drew nigh, which is called the Passover.
2 And the chief priests and scribes sought how they might kill him; for they feared the people.

The Jewish leaders were unable to locate Jesus except for the times when crowds were gathered around him. They seemed to always lose respect in the eyes of the Jewish masses as a result of the confrontations they had with Jesus on those occasions. They were just not mentally equipped for those verbal duels with the Son of God. Now, not wanting to go head to head with Jesus in front of a Passover crowd, they conspire to attempt his capture after the crowds are cleared out of Jerusalem (they were afraid of the common people). Matthew and Mark both use the same Greek word ("dolos") to describe the proposed method for capturing and killing Jesus - TRICKERY aka "subtilty" (Matthew 26:4,KJV) aka "craft" (Mark 14:1,KJV).

So, here's the dilemma for these Jewish leaders. Who can we find to lead us to Jesus at a time when he is not surrounded by crowds of adoring Jews? We'll find our culprit later on in these three chapters - Judas Iscariot.

Supper at a leper's house (Matthew 26:6-13; Mark 14:3-9)
The detailed notes on these passages may be found in the May 1 reading which includes John 12:1-11; click here.
Matthew and Mark have just made reference to the time in Matthew 26:2 and Mark 14:1 as being two days before the passover. While they continue their narratives into this passage, neither Matthew nor Mark declare when the supper at Simon the leper's house actually took place. In fact, we know from John 12:1 that the supper was held in Bethany four days prior to this "six days before the passover." It must be concluded, therefore, that the Matthew and Mark accounts are not following this event sequentially. All three passages regarding the event are shown below, but the detailed notes may be found in the section where we sequentially dealt with John 12:1-11 (see notes).

Matthew 26
Mark 14
John 12
6 Now when Jesus was in Bethany, in the house of Simon the leper,
7 There came unto him a woman having an alabaster box of very precious ointment, and poured it on his head, as he sat at meat.
8 But when his disciples saw it, they had indignation, saying, To what purpose is this waste?
9 For this ointment might have been sold for much, and given to the poor.
10 When Jesus understood it, he said unto them, Why trouble ye the woman? for she hath wrought a good work upon me.
11 For ye have the poor always with you; but me ye have not always.
12 For in that she hath poured this ointment on my body, she did it for my burial.
13 Verily I say unto you, Wheresoever this gospel shall be preached in the whole world, there shall also this, that this woman hath done, be told for a memorial of her.
3 And being in Bethany in the house of Simon the leper, as he sat at meat, there came a woman having an alabaster box of ointment of spikenard very precious; and she brake the box, and poured it on his head.
4 And there were some that had indignation within themselves, and said, Why was this waste of the ointment made?
5 For it might have been sold for more than three hundred pence, and have been given to the poor. And they murmured against her.
6 And Jesus said, Let her alone; why trouble ye her? she hath wrought a good work on me.
7 For ye have the poor with you always, and whensoever ye will ye may do them good: but me ye have not always.
8 She hath done what she could: she is come aforehand to anoint my body to the burying.
9 Verily I say unto you, Wheresoever this gospel shall be preached throughout the whole world, this also that she hath done shall be spoken of for a memorial of her.
1 Then Jesus six days before the passover came to Bethany, where Lazarus was which had been dead, whom he raised from the dead.
2 There they made him a supper; and Martha served: but Lazarus was one of them that sat at the table with him.
3 Then took Mary a pound of ointment of spikenard, very costly, and anointed the feet of Jesus, and wiped his feet with her hair: and the house was filled with the odour of the ointment.
4 Then saith one of his disciples, Judas Iscariot, Simon’s son, which should betray him,
5 Why was not this ointment sold for three hundred pence, and given to the poor?
6 This he said, not that he cared for the poor; but because he was a thief, and had the bag, and bare what was put therein.
7 Then said Jesus, Let her alone: against the day of my burying hath she kept this.
8 For the poor always ye have with you; but me ye have not always.
9 Much people of the Jews therefore knew that he was there: and they came not for Jesus’ sake only, but that they might see Lazarus also, whom he had raised from the dead.
10 But the chief priests consulted that they might put Lazarus also to death;
11 Because that by reason of him many of the Jews went away, and believed on Jesus.

The detailed notes on the passages above may be found in the May 1 reading which includes John 12:1-11; click here.

Judas makes a deal (Matthew 26:14-16; Mark 14:10-11; Luke 22:3-6)

Matthew 26
Mark 14
Luke 22
14 Then one of the twelve, called Judas Iscariot, went unto the chief priests,
15 And said unto them, What will ye give me, and I will deliver him unto you? And they covenanted with him for thirty pieces of silver.
16 And from that time he sought opportunity to betray him.
10 And Judas Iscariot, one of the twelve, went unto the chief priests, to betray him unto them.
11 And when they heard it, they were glad, and promised to give him money. And he sought how he might conveniently betray him.
3 Then entered Satan into Judas surnamed Iscariot, being of the number of the twelve.
4 And he went his way, and communed with the chief priests and captains, how he might betray him unto them.
5 And they were glad, and covenanted to give him money.
6 And he promised, and sought opportunity to betray him unto them in the absence of the multitude.

There had been a concern among the Jewish leadership regarding the reaction of the people to capturing Jesus. Judas provides a solution when he goes to the Jewish leaders and offers to take them to Jesus away from the multitudes so that he can be taken prisoner quietly. Luke 22:6 says, "And he promised, and sought opportunity to betray him unto them in the absence of the multitude." This is great news to the Jewish leaders. With this betrayal, they can keep the whole issue out of the news; at least that's what they thought. For those who may think that Judas somehow made his decision on some ill-conceived noble principles, think again. Look at Matthew's account in verse 15 where Judas says to the Jewish leaders, "What will ye give me, and I will deliver him unto you?" The only principle seen here is GREED!

Preparation for the last passover (Matthew 26:17-19; Mark 14:12-16; Luke 22:7-13)

Matthew 26
Mark 14
Luke 22
17 Now the first day of the feast of unleavened bread the disciples came to Jesus, saying unto him, Where wilt thou that we prepare for thee to eat the passover?
18 And he said, Go into the city to such a man, and say unto him, The Master saith, My time is at hand; I will keep the passover at thy house with my disciples.
19 And the disciples did as Jesus had appointed them; and they made ready the passover.
12 And the first day of unleavened bread, when they killed the passover, his disciples said unto him, Where wilt thou that we go and prepare that thou mayest eat the passover?
13 And he sendeth forth two of his disciples, and saith unto them, Go ye into the city, and there shall meet you a man bearing a pitcher of water: follow him.
14 And wheresoever he shall go in, say ye to the goodman of the house, The Master saith, Where is the guestchamber, where I shall eat the passover with my disciples?
15 And he will shew you a large upper room furnished and prepared: there make ready for us.
16 And his disciples went forth, and came into the city, and found as he had said unto them: and they made ready the passover.
7 Then came the day of unleavened bread, when the passover must be killed.
8 And he sent Peter and John, saying, Go and prepare us the passover, that we may eat.
9 And they said unto him, Where wilt thou that we prepare?
10 And he said unto them, Behold, when ye are entered into the city, there shall a man meet you, bearing a pitcher of water; follow him into the house where he entereth in.
11 And ye shall say unto the goodman of the house, The Master saith unto thee, Where is the guestchamber, where I shall eat the passover with my disciples?
12 And he shall shew you a large upper room furnished: there make ready.
13 And they went, and found as he had said unto them: and they made ready the passover.

Jesus and his disciples observe passover on the day identified as "the first day of unleavened bread, when they killed the passover." See the note regarding observance of the Passover in Jesus' day. It is obvious that some observed the actual meal on the evening of Nisan 14 when the lamb was actually slain, while others observed the Passover meal on the following evening, Nisan 15. The box to the right here explains it all.

Jesus' last passover meal (Matthew 26:20-21; Mark 14:17-18; Luke 22:14-16; John 13:1-3)

Matthew 26
Mark 14
Luke 22
John 13
20 Now when the even was come, he sat down with the twelve.
21 And as they did eat, he said, Verily I say unto you, that one of you shall betray me.
17 And in the evening he cometh with the twelve.
18 And as they sat and did eat, Jesus said, Verily I say unto you, One of you which eateth with me shall betray me.
14 And when the hour was come, he sat down, and the twelve apostles with him.
15 And he said unto them, With desire I have desired to eat this passover with you before I suffer:
16 For I say unto you, I will not any more eat thereof, until it be fulfilled in the kingdom of God.
1 Now before the feast of the passover, when Jesus knew that his hour was come that he should depart out of this world unto the Father, having loved his own which were in the world, he loved them unto the end.
2 And supper being ended, the devil having now put into the heart of Judas Iscariot, Simon’s son, to betray him;
3 Jesus knowing that the Father had given all things into his hands, and that he was come from God, and went to God;


Jesus sits down for the passover meal with all 12 of his disciples and proclaims that his hour of suffering has come. In addition, he prophesies that one of the disciples will betray him.

Here is the sequence of events for that evening we derive by comparing all four Gospel accounts:

  1. Passover meal with reference to betrayal (Matthew 26:20-21; Mark 14:17-18; Luke 22:14-16; John 13:1-3)
    Only Luke fails to mention Jesus' comment about the betrayal here.
  2. Feet washing (Only recorded in John 13:4-20, see below)
    Judas participates in this.
  3. Return to the table (John 13:21-28, see below)
  4. Jesus identifies the betrayer (John 13:26, see below)
  5. Judas leaves the room (John 13:30, see below)
  6. Communion aka "The Lord's Supper" (Matthew 26:26-30; Mark 14:22-26; Luke 22:17-20 - see below)
    Judas is not present for communion.

Let's wash some feet (John 13:4-20)

4 He riseth from supper, and laid aside his garments; and took a towel, and girded himself.
5 After that he poureth water into a bason, and began to wash the disciples’ feet, and to wipe them with the towel wherewith he was girded.
6 Then cometh he to Simon Peter: and Peter saith unto him, Lord, dost thou wash my feet?
7 Jesus answered and said unto him, What I do thou knowest not now; but thou shalt know hereafter.
8 Peter saith unto him, Thou shalt never wash my feet. Jesus answered him, If I wash thee not, thou hast no part with me.
9 Simon Peter saith unto him, Lord, not my feet only, but also my hands and my head.
10 Jesus saith to him, He that is washed needeth not save to wash his feet, but is clean every whit: and ye are clean, but not all.
11 For he knew who should betray him; therefore said he, Ye are not all clean.
12 So after he had washed their feet, and had taken his garments, and was set down again, he said unto them, Know ye what I have done to you?
13 Ye call me Master and Lord: and ye say well; for so I am.
14 If I then, your Lord and Master, have washed your feet; ye also ought to wash one another’s feet.
15 For I have given you an example, that ye should do as I have done to you.
16 Verily, verily, I say unto you, The servant is not greater than his lord; neither he that is sent greater than he that sent him.
17 If ye know these things, happy are ye if ye do them.
18 I speak not of you all: I know whom I have chosen: but that the scripture may be fulfilled, He that eateth bread with me hath lifted up his heel against me.
19 Now I tell you before it come, that, when it is come to pass, ye may believe that I am he.
20 Verily, verily, I say unto you, He that receiveth whomsoever I send receiveth me; and he that receiveth me receiveth him that sent me.

It's after the passover supper when Jesus does something that obviously surprises the disciples - well Peter anyway; he washes their feet. It's interesting that Matthew, Mark and Luke record the institution of the Lord's supper after the passover meal, but John does not. Instead, John records the event that follows afterward (foot washing), and the other three gospel authors do not. Peter finds this foot-washing ritual very unsettling. There's obviously no question here in his mind regarding the lordship of Jesus. In typical Peter style, he thinks it not appropriate for Jesus to wash his feet. On the other hand, there's Judas. We saw in this passage (verse 2) that he has already determined to betray Jesus. It is significant to note that Jesus is promoting the demonstration of humility among the disciples with this act as he says in verse 14, "If I then, your Lord and Master, have washed your feet; ye also ought to wash one another’s feet." This act takes on perspective when we recognize that the conversation about who's the greatest in Luke 22:24-30 (see below) takes place at the same time. By recognizing that these two events are tied together, we see that this served as a unique lesson on humility for the disciples at that time and is not an act intended to be observed down through the ages as an ordinance like baptism and communion. Both baptism and communion commemorate Jesus' sacrifice (our relationship to our Lord), while the washing of feet on this occasion was for the purpose of teaching a lesson on authority to the disciples.

It occurs to me that the foot-washing episode six days earlier must have been looming in the disciples' minds as this event was taking place (see notes above).

Judas identified as the betrayer (Matthew 26:22-25; Mark 14:19-21; John 13:21-35)

Matthew 26
Mark 14
John 13
22 And they were exceeding sorrowful, and began every one of them to say unto him, Lord, is it I?
23 And he answered and said, He that dippeth his hand with me in the dish, the same shall betray me.
24 The Son of man goeth as it is written of him: but woe unto that man by whom the Son of man is betrayed! it had been good for that man if he had not been born.
25 Then Judas, which betrayed him, answered and said, Master, is it I? He said unto him, Thou hast said.
19 And they began to be sorrowful, and to say unto him one by one, Is it I? and another said, Is it I?
20 And he answered and said unto them, It is one of the twelve, that dippeth with me in the dish.
21 The Son of man indeed goeth, as it is written of him: but woe to that man by whom the Son of man is betrayed! good were it for that man if he had never been born.
21 When Jesus had thus said, he was troubled in spirit, and testified, and said, Verily, verily, I say unto you, that one of you shall betray me.
22 Then the disciples looked one on another, doubting of whom he spake.
23 Now there was leaning on Jesus’ bosom one of his disciples, whom Jesus loved.
24 Simon Peter therefore beckoned to him, that he should ask who it should be of whom he spake.
25 He then lying on Jesus’ breast saith unto him, Lord, who is it?
26 Jesus answered, He it is, to whom I shall give a sop, when I have dipped it. And when he had dipped the sop, he gave it to Judas Iscariot, the son of Simon.
27 And after the sop Satan entered into him. Then said Jesus unto him, That thou doest, do quickly.
28 Now no man at the table knew for what intent he spake this unto him.
29 For some of them thought, because Judas had the bag, that Jesus had said unto him, Buy those things that we have need of against the feast; or, that he should give something to the poor.
30 He then having received the sop went immediately out: and it was night.
31 Therefore, when he was gone out, Jesus said, Now is the Son of man glorified, and God is glorified in him.
32 If God be glorified in him, God shall also glorify him in himself, and shall straightway glorify him.
33 Little children, yet a little while I am with you. Ye shall seek me: and as I said unto the Jews, Whither I go, ye cannot come; so now I say to you.
34 A new commandment I give unto you, That ye love one another; as I have loved you, that ye also love one another.
35 By this shall all men know that ye are my disciples, if ye have love one to another.

John's gospel gives the most detail here. Jesus proclaims to the twelve that one of them will betray him. They begin to ask among themselves who this should be. Jesus clearly identifies Judas in John's gospel by giving him the word right there at the supper table. This identification apparently isn't completely clear to the other disciples when Jesus sends Judas away to go about his betrayal business. We know this from John 13:28-29.

Incidentally, the identification of one of the disciples in verse 23, "one of his disciples, whom Jesus loved," is a reference to John himself - the one who wrote this Gospel. He is clearly identified in John 21:20-25 (see notes).

John 13:34-35 are foundational verses for several exhortations in the epistles regarding the attitude of Believers toward one another. Notice what Jesus says here on this subject, "A new commandment I give unto you, That ye love one another; as I have loved you, that ye also love one another. By this shall all men know that ye are my disciples, if ye have love one to another." Simply put, Believers are to be known by the fact that they demonstrate love toward other Believers.

The Lord's supper instituted (Matthew 26:26-30; Mark 14:22-26; Luke 22:17-20)

Matthew 26
Mark 14
Luke 22
26 And as they were eating, Jesus took bread, and blessed it, and brake it, and gave it to the disciples, and said, Take, eat; this is my body.
27 And he took the cup, and gave thanks, and gave it to them, saying, Drink ye all of it;
28 For this is my blood of the new testament, which is shed for many for the remission of sins.
29 But I say unto you, I will not drink henceforth of this fruit of the vine, until that day when I drink it new with you in my Father’s kingdom.
30 And when they had sung an hymn, they went out into the mount of Olives.
22 And as they did eat, Jesus took bread, and blessed, and brake it, and gave to them, and said, Take, eat: this is my body.
23 And he took the cup, and when he had given thanks, he gave it to them: and they all drank of it.
24 And he said unto them, This is my blood of the new testament, which is shed for many.
25 Verily I say unto you, I will drink no more of the fruit of the vine, until that day that I drink it new in the kingdom of God.
26 And when they had sung an hymn, they went out into the mount of Olives.
17 And he took the cup, and gave thanks, and said, Take this, and divide it among yourselves:
18 For I say unto you, I will not drink of the fruit of the vine, until the kingdom of God shall come.
19 And he took bread, and gave thanks, and brake it, and gave unto them, saying, This is my body which is given for you: this do in remembrance of me.
20 Likewise also the cup after supper, saying, This cup is the new testament in my blood, which is shed for you.

Here's where our ordinance began. All three synoptic gospels detail the event that followed their passover meal. However, only Luke includes the words of Jesus in verse 19, "...this do in remembrance of me." Paul further adds support to the continual observance of communion by believers when he says in I Corinthians 11:26 (see notes), "For as often as ye eat this bread, and drink this cup, ye do shew the Lord’s death till he come." While no interval between observances is specified, it appears that the disciples in the Book of Acts observed communion on a weekly basis, and perhaps each time they met; this seems to be indicated in Acts 20:7 (see notes), "And upon the first day of the week, when the disciples came together to break bread, Paul preached unto them, ready to depart on the morrow; and continued his speech until midnight." However, there is no correct interval mandated for the observance of this ordinance.

Jesus declares that the bread is a picture of his body and the drink a picture of his "shed" blood; all three accounts make this point very clearly. Jesus makes a very clear statement regarding the covenant represented by this action - the "new testament." The Greek word for "testament" here is "diatheke" and is interchangeably translated "covenant" in the New Testament. It is important to recognize that the old covenant is the Mosaic Law; the new covenant is salvation by grace through the shed blood of Jesus Christ. Christians today get confused when they fail to differentiate the two.

Matthew (verse 30) and Mark (verse 26) report that this first communion was concluded with the singing of a hymn. It is likely that this was the singing of one of the songs found between Psalms 113-118 (see notes). Jewish tradition tells us that these were songs that were sung as part of the Passover celebration.

Who's the greatest? (Luke 22:21-30)

21 But, behold, the hand of him that betrayeth me is with me on the table.
22 And truly the Son of man goeth, as it was determined: but woe unto that man by whom he is betrayed!
23 And they began to enquire among themselves, which of them it was that should do this thing.
24 And there was also a strife among them, which of them should be accounted the greatest.
25 And he said unto them, The kings of the Gentiles exercise lordship over them; and they that exercise authority upon them are called benefactors.
26 But ye shall not be so: but he that is greatest among you, let him be as the younger; and he that is chief, as he that doth serve.
27 For whether is greater, he that sitteth at meat, or he that serveth? is not he that sitteth at meat? but I am among you as he that serveth.
28 Ye are they which have continued with me in my temptations.
29 And I appoint unto you a kingdom, as my Father hath appointed unto me;
30 That ye may eat and drink at my table in my kingdom, and sit on thrones judging the twelve tribes of Israel.

As the disciples are there talking about the identity of the betrayer, they wander into a discussion about who's the greatest among them. John doesn't record this discussion, but it is interesting that the foot-washing ceremony happens at the same sitting. It is logical to assume that Jesus' words, "ye also ought to wash one another’s feet," are spoken to emphasize the servant component rather than the leadership component of being one of Jesus' disciples.

One more aspect of this is interesting. John doesn't record the "who's the greatest" discussion, but he does record the foot washing which, I believe, is related. John also doesn't record another incident which took place some time back as was recorded in Matthew 20:20-28 and Mark 10:35-45 (see notes). On that occasion it was John himself and his brother, James, who sought some guarantees about their future place in the coming kingdom. They even used their mama as their agent on that occasion. Jesus used that occasion to emphasize "serving" as the essential quality of a disciple back then as well. Incidentally, on that occasion the other disciples were "moved with indignation against the two brethren."

This competition for ruling supremacy among the twelve had a basis in Jesus' previous teaching. Jesus said in Matthew 19:28 (see notes), "Verily I say unto you, That ye which have followed me, in the regeneration when the Son of man shall sit in the throne of his glory, ye also shall sit upon twelve thrones, judging the twelve tribes of Israel." But wait! There's more. We see the New Jerusalem which is established in Revelation 21. Look at Revelation 21:14 (see notes), "And the wall of the city had twelve foundations, and in them the names of the twelve apostles of the Lamb." So, who gets to be the big man among the twelve? Well...Jesus...of course.


For commentary on another passage, click here.


Copyright 2003-2011 by Wayne D. Turner