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The daily summaries are written by Wayne D. Turner, Pastor of Fayette Bible Church in Fayetteville, Georgia

This is the July 17 reading. Select here for a new reading date:


BibleTrack Summary: July 17
<< Psa 110

For New King James text and comment, click here.

Psalms 111-118     Listen Podcast

 

Praise ye the Lord (Psalm 111)

1 Praise ye the LORD. I will praise the LORD with my whole heart, in the assembly of the upright, and in the congregation.
2 The works of the LORD are great, sought out of all them that have pleasure therein.
3 His work is honourable and glorious: and his righteousness endureth for ever.
4 He hath made his wonderful works to be remembered: the LORD is gracious and full of compassion.
5 He hath given meat unto them that fear him: he will ever be mindful of his covenant.
6 He hath shewed his people the power of his works, that he may give them the heritage of the heathen.
7 The works of his hands are verity and judgment; all his commandments are sure.
8 They stand fast for ever and ever, and are done in truth and uprightness.
9 He sent redemption unto his people: he hath commanded his covenant for ever: holy and reverend is his name.
10 The fear of the LORD is the beginning of wisdom: a good understanding have all they that do his commandments: his praise endureth for ever.

We don't know who wrote this Psalm, but it seems to be the same author who wrote this and Psalm 112. It opens and closes with a call to praise God. Verse 5 says, "...he will ever be mindful of his covenant." He says again in verse 9, "He sent redemption unto his people: he hath commanded his covenant for ever:" It's not clear to which covenant he refers, but it is likely the covenant God made with Abraham that is in view here (see Abrahamic Covenant). One thing is for certain; the Psalmist knows the value of a covenant with God.

Except for the introduction, "Praise ye the LORD," this is an acrostic Psalm. Each verse has two or three phrases - each beginning with the next successive letter of the Hebrew alphabet. This was an oft-used poetic writing style in Hebrew.

The attributes of a righteous man (Psalm 112)

1 Praise ye the LORD. Blessed is the man that feareth the LORD, that delighteth greatly in his commandments.
2 His seed shall be mighty upon earth: the generation of the upright shall be blessed.
3 Wealth and riches shall be in his house: and his righteousness endureth for ever.
4 Unto the upright there ariseth light in the darkness: he is gracious, and full of compassion, and righteous.
5 A good man sheweth favour, and lendeth: he will guide his affairs with discretion.
6 Surely he shall not be moved for ever: the righteous shall be in everlasting remembrance.
7 He shall not be afraid of evil tidings: his heart is fixed, trusting in the LORD.
8 His heart is established, he shall not be afraid, until he see his desire upon his enemies.
9 He hath dispersed, he hath given to the poor; his righteousness endureth for ever; his horn shall be exalted with honour.
10 The wicked shall see it, and be grieved; he shall gnash with his teeth, and melt away: the desire of the wicked shall perish.

Probably written by the same author as Psalm 111, here's a comparison between the righteous and the wicked. It's also written in an acrostic poetry style (see notes on Psalm 111, above). We see in verse 1 the primary characteristic of the righteous, "Praise ye the LORD. Blessed is the man that feareth the LORD, that delighteth greatly in his commandments." In the last verse (10) we see the consequence of the wicked, "The wicked shall see it, and be grieved; he shall gnash with his teeth, and melt away: the desire of the wicked shall perish."

In making his appeal about being generous in giving of one's resources, Paul quotes most of verse 9 in II Corinthians 9:9 (see notes), "As it is written, He hath dispersed abroad; he hath given to the poor: his righteousness remaineth for ever."

About Psalms 113-118
We are told that Psalms 113-118 were sung before and after the passover feast each year - 113 and 114 before the meal and the remaining four afterward. Mark 14:26 (see notes) says, "And when they had sung an hymn, they went out into the mount of Olives." This hymn that Jesus and his disciples sang just prior to his crucifixion was likely taken from Psalms 113-118. The identity of the author of these six Psalms is not known.

Praise ye the LORD. (Psalm 113)

1 Praise ye the LORD. Praise, O ye servants of the LORD, praise the name of the LORD.
2 Blessed be the name of the LORD from this time forth and for evermore.
3 From the rising of the sun unto the going down of the same the LORD’S name is to be praised.
4 The LORD is high above all nations, and his glory above the heavens.
5 Who is like unto the LORD our God, who dwelleth on high,
6 Who humbleth himself to behold the things that are in heaven, and in the earth!
7 He raiseth up the poor out of the dust, and lifteth the needy out of the dunghill;
8 That he may set him with princes, even with the princes of his people.
9 He maketh the barren woman to keep house, and to be a joyful mother of children. Praise ye the LORD.

Author unknown - this Psalm begins with, "Praise ye the LORD." It ends with the same phrase. All the verses in between demonstrate to us why the righteous should do so.

See note on Psalms 113-118 above for the special usage of this Psalm.

A little refresher history (Psalm 114)

1 When Israel went out of Egypt, the house of Jacob from a people of strange language;
2 Judah was his sanctuary, and Israel his dominion.
3 The sea saw it, and fled: Jordan was driven back.
4 The mountains skipped like rams, and the little hills like lambs.
5 What ailed thee, O thou sea, that thou fleddest? thou Jordan, that thou wast driven back?
6 Ye mountains, that ye skipped like rams; and ye little hills, like lambs?
7 Tremble, thou earth, at the presence of the Lord, at the presence of the God of Jacob;
8 Which turned the rock into a standing water, the flint into a fountain of waters.

This Psalm isn't long, but it reminds the readers of God's manifestation to Israel in their deliverance from Egyptian captivity - the miraculous crossings of the Red Sea and Jordan, along with water from the rock. We aren't given the identity of the author for this Psalm.

See note on Psalms 113-118 above for the special usage of this Psalm.

Sometimes the heathen can be irritating (Psalm 115)

1 Not unto us, O LORD, not unto us, but unto thy name give glory, for thy mercy, and for thy truth’s sake.
2 Wherefore should the heathen say, Where is now their God?
3 But our God is in the heavens: he hath done whatsoever he hath pleased.
4 Their idols are silver and gold, the work of men’s hands.
5 They have mouths, but they speak not: eyes have they, but they see not:
6 They have ears, but they hear not: noses have they, but they smell not:
7 They have hands, but they handle not: feet have they, but they walk not: neither speak they through their throat.
8 They that make them are like unto them; so is every one that trusteth in them.
9 O Israel, trust thou in the LORD: he is their help and their shield.
10 O house of Aaron, trust in the LORD: he is their help and their shield.
11 Ye that fear the LORD, trust in the LORD: he is their help and their shield.
12 The LORD hath been mindful of us: he will bless us; he will bless the house of Israel; he will bless the house of Aaron.
13 He will bless them that fear the LORD, both small and great.
14 The LORD shall increase you more and more, you and your children.
15 Ye are blessed of the LORD which made heaven and earth.
16 The heaven, even the heavens, are the LORD’S: but the earth hath he given to the children of men.
17 The dead praise not the LORD, neither any that go down into silence.
18 But we will bless the LORD from this time forth and for evermore. Praise the LORD.

Our God is in Heaven. When the heathen question his presence, this unknown Psalmist simply points to the ridiculous notion that their lifeless idols have any god value whatsoever; they are powerless.

See note on Psalms 113-118 above for the special usage of this Psalm.

Our relationship with God is a great comfort (Psalm 116)

1 I love the LORD, because he hath heard my voice and my supplications.
2 Because he hath inclined his ear unto me, therefore will I call upon him as long as I live.
3 The sorrows of death compassed me, and the pains of hell gat hold upon me: I found trouble and sorrow.
4 Then called I upon the name of the LORD; O LORD, I beseech thee, deliver my soul.
5 Gracious is the LORD, and righteous; yea, our God is merciful.
6 The LORD preserveth the simple: I was brought low, and he helped me.
7 Return unto thy rest, O my soul; for the LORD hath dealt bountifully with thee.
8 For thou hast delivered my soul from death, mine eyes from tears, and my feet from falling.
9 I will walk before the LORD in the land of the living.
10 I believed, therefore have I spoken: I was greatly afflicted:
11 I said in my haste, All men are liars.
12 What shall I render unto the LORD for all his benefits toward me?
13 I will take the cup of salvation, and call upon the name of the LORD.
14 I will pay my vows unto the LORD now in the presence of all his people.
15 Precious in the sight of the LORD is the death of his saints.
16 O LORD, truly I am thy servant; I am thy servant, and the son of thine handmaid: thou hast loosed my bonds.
17 I will offer to thee the sacrifice of thanksgiving, and will call upon the name of the LORD.
18 I will pay my vows unto the LORD now in the presence of all his people,
19 In the courts of the LORD’S house, in the midst of thee, O Jerusalem. Praise ye the LORD.

The author here is unknown. He points out that the relationship we have with God is our greatest asset. Look at the way he starts this Psalm, "I love the LORD, because he hath heard my voice and my supplications." It's a father-child relationship where God is intent on meeting our needs. Notice the confidence of the Psalmist in his eternal destiny with the Lord in verse 15, "Precious in the sight of the LORD is the death of his saints."

Incidentally, Paul quotes verse 10 in II Corinthians 4:13 (see notes) to make the point that he is speaking by the same Spirit as this Psalmist.

See note on Psalms 113-118 above for the special usage of this Psalm.

The LORD endureth for ever (Psalm 117)

1 O praise the LORD, all ye nations: praise him, all ye people.
2 For his merciful kindness is great toward us: and the truth of the LORD endureth FOR EVER. PRAISE YE THE LORD.

Paul quotes verse 1 in Romans 15:11 (see notes), "And again, Praise the Lord, all ye Gentiles; and laud him, all ye people." Note: Old Testament "nations" is synonymous with New Testament "Gentiles." There he seeks to demonstrate this unknown Psalmists invitation for Gentiles to rejoice in the One True God. This Psalm is short, but the theme is long; God is eternal. Notice what he says about truth in verse 2, "the truth of the LORD endureth for ever." Truth is a constant; it does not change.

See note on Psalms 113-118 above for the special usage of this Psalm.

Confidence in God is better (Psalm 118)

1 O give thanks unto the LORD; for he is good: because his mercy endureth for ever.
2 Let Israel now say, that his mercy endureth for ever.
3 Let the house of Aaron now say, that his mercy endureth for ever.
4 Let them now that fear the LORD say, that his mercy endureth for ever.
5 I called upon the LORD in distress: the LORD answered me, and set me in a large place.
6 The LORD is on my side; I will not fear: what can man do unto me?
7 The LORD taketh my part with them that help me: therefore shall I see my desire upon them that hate me.
8 It is better to trust in the LORD than to put confidence in man.
9 It is better to trust in the LORD than to put confidence in princes.
10 All nations compassed me about: but in the name of the LORD will I destroy them.
11 They compassed me about; yea, they compassed me about: but in the name of the LORD I will destroy them.
12 They compassed me about like bees; they are quenched as the fire of thorns: for in the name of the LORD I will destroy them.
13 Thou hast thrust sore at me that I might fall: but the LORD helped me.
14 The LORD is my strength and song, and is become my salvation.
15 The voice of rejoicing and salvation is in the tabernacles of the righteous: the right hand of the LORD doeth valiantly.
16 The right hand of the LORD is exalted: the right hand of the LORD doeth valiantly.
17 I shall not die, but live, and declare the works of the LORD.
18 The LORD hath chastened me sore: but he hath not given me over unto death.
19 Open to me the gates of righteousness: I will go into them, and I will praise the LORD:
20 This gate of the LORD, into which the righteous shall enter.
21 I will praise thee: for thou hast heard me, and art become my salvation.
22 The stone which the builders refused is become the head stone of the corner.
23 This is the LORD’S doing; it is marvellous in our eyes.
24 This is the day which the LORD hath made; we will rejoice and be glad in it.
25 Save now, I beseech thee, O LORD: O LORD, I beseech thee, send now prosperity.
26 Blessed be he that cometh in the name of the LORD: we have blessed you out of the house of the LORD.
27 God is the LORD, which hath shewed us light: bind the sacrifice with cords, even unto the horns of the altar.
28 Thou art my God, and I will praise thee: thou art my God, I will exalt thee.
29 O give thanks unto the LORD; for he is good: for his mercy endureth for ever.

Although the author is unknown, here's a very quotable Psalm. Verse 8 says, "It is better to trust in the LORD than to put confidence in man." You gotta love that verse. This Psalm becomes very notable because of verse 22, "The stone which the builders refused is become the head stone of the corner." That's the verse Peter quoted in Acts 4:11 (see notes). However, notice that it is used in a prophetic context in Isaiah 28:16 (see notes), "Therefore thus saith the Lord GOD, Behold, I lay in Zion for a foundation a stone, a tried stone, a precious corner stone, a sure foundation: he that believeth shall not make haste." Jesus is the cornerstone who was rejected. This verse is also used by Jesus himself in a parable to the Jewish leaders regarding his imminent crucifixion in Matthew 21:42/Mark 12:10/Luke 20:17 (see notes). Then we see it quoted two more times by Paul and Peter in Romans 9:33 (see notes) and I Peter 2:6 (see notes).

Jesus also quotes verse 26 in Matthew 23:39 (see notes). In that passage, Jesus proclaims with that quote that the Messianic requirement will be fulfilled after his resurrection.

See note on Psalms 113-118 above for the special usage of this Psalm.


For commentary on another passage, click here.


Copyright 2003-2011 by Wayne D. Turner